Chateau Lascombes

Listed Wines Lascombes
Owner Mutuelle d’Assurances du Corps de Sante Francais (MACSF)
President Dominique Befve
Annual Production ​(Grand Vin) 250-300,000 bottles
Classification Deuxieme Crus (Second-Growths)
Appellation Margaux
Second Wine Chevalier de Lascombes
Interesting Fact Before its 2011 sale to MACSF, the late Tony Ryan (founder of Ryanair), had a 40% share in the property. It was his favourite wine, and he held a personal stash of Chateau Lascombes worth €3 million.
lascombes

Brand

In 2011 Lascombes lept up the Liv-ex Bordeaux Power 100 (a list of the most powerful and influential estates in the region) 27 places in one year, to rank in 43rd place.  Having grown 31.9% in value year-on-year, its ranking is a further indicator of market confidence in this estate which has been gifted by a string of valuable investments made first by American firm colony capital, and, going into the future, MASCF. At the time of the sale the firm’s CEO Marcel Kahn was quoted as saying “We have enormous respect for all the work and investment that has been put into Lascombes, which has returned it to its Second Growth status... we see this as a long-term investment, and are interested in ensuring continuity and future growth", a clear indicator of their interest in pushing these wines even further. The winery team is superb, with Dominique Befve, formerly of Chateau Lafite-Rothschild, Duhart-Milon and l’Evangile, kept on as winemaker through the changeover and Michel Rolland remaining as consultant oenologist.

In years gone by, Lascombes was a serious rival to nearby First-Growth Chateau Margaux and quality is now evidently moving back in that direction. Lascombes 2010 was awarded 96 pts by Robert Parker and became the estate’s most critically appraised wine ever. Though release prices for this vintage were placed strategically high ahead of its sale to MASCF, it has still performed very well since release. Vintage releases between 2011 and 2017 have remained inconsistent but there is a feeling around the market that the wines are starting to show their potential under the MACSF ownership. Further investment in the estate will no doubt propel the wines to new heights in coming years.

Critic Appraisal

The scattered plots of Chateau Lascombe, lying on a range of soil types and thicknesses, at varying latitudes and orientations, result in a remarkably complex and balanced wine. Its is oaky and dense but with remarkable sweetness and a wealth of fruity sensuality. The improvements that were made by the previous owner, Colony Capital can be seen by the Parker scores the wines have received since 2000, with many years thereafter seeing unprecendented scores. Its 2001 effort first became its best ever, a feat then replicated in 2002, 2005 and 2010 with each vintage attaining a new ‘best-ever’ score. Lascombes 2010 achieved a 96 point score upon bottling and thus became the best ever scored vintage. "The wine hits all cylinders in 2010. The average alcohol for the bottled wine is 14%. It has a gorgeously sweet nose of creme de cassis, spring flowers, subtle barbecue smoke and charcoal followed by full body, beautiful intensity, great purity, stature and length. The influence of any oak is minimal, despite the fact that 90% new French oak was used. Needless to say, this is an example of modern-styled winemaking at its finest, and arguments that such wines will not age well, do not represent their terroir , and are soul-less, are totally groundless. Give it five or so years of cellaring and drink it over the following 25-30 years. This is one of the great Margaux wines of the vintage.

Probably the greatest Lascombes made to date, the 2010 is a blend of 55% Merlot, 45% Cabernet Sauvignon and the rest Petit Verdot. The production from this huge estate totals nearly 400,000 bottles." Robert Parker Jr. 96 pts

History

Owned by the Lascombe family from the 17th to the mid-18th century, Chateau Lascombes then went through a string of owners until 1844, when it came into the hands of the Hue family who oversaw its classification as a Second-Growth in 1855. Stability never lasted long, with the estate going through a succession of owners, many of whom paid the estate little attention. Thus, understandably, Chateau Lascombes was languishing somewhat when Alex Lichine, with the support of an American shareholders committee, purchased the estate in 1952, a year after his acquisition of Chateau Priere-Lichine.

Winemaking facilities were modernised and the tiny, fragmented vineyards were augmented by new land. Whilst the quality of the wine improved somewhat, the new terroir was planted with grapes ill-suited to it which hindered a complete renaissance. Lichine’s group of backers were bought out by American brewer Bass Charrington in 1971. They continued improvements, refurbishing the cellars, but lacking expertise continued to invest in poorly suited terroir with too-young vines. After 10 years of wavering, Bass Charrington hired the expertise of Rene Vannetelle and started putting things right- installing a new chai and addressing the problem of ill-suited parcels; delineating plots and rejecting poor fruit. 

Colony Captital, an American pension fund, acquired the property in 2001 and invested €35 million in Lascombes over 9 years, spent on a massive overhaul of the winery and vineyards. Finally, the wine was beginning to meet its potential, receiving excellent Parker scores - with release prices tripling between 2000 and 2009. In 2011, the estate was sold for a mighty €200 million, coming back into French hands for the first time in 60 years. The buyer was MACSF, a health insurance group, who have made clear their intention to make a long-term investment in Lascombes, keeping on Dominique Befve as president and Michel Rolland as consultant.

Chateau Lascombes Pricing

Wine Vintage Producer Market price Unit size
Lascombes 2017 Chateau Lascombes £529.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 2016 Chateau Lascombes £601.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 2015 Chateau Lascombes £670.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 2014 Chateau Lascombes £540.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 2013 Chateau Lascombes £549.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 2012 Chateau Lascombes £588.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 2011 Chateau Lascombes £574.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 2010 Chateau Lascombes £900.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 2009 Chateau Lascombes £760.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 2008 Chateau Lascombes £844.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 2007 Chateau Lascombes £1,061.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 2006 Chateau Lascombes £820.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 2005 Chateau Lascombes £861.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 2004 Chateau Lascombes £660.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 2003 Chateau Lascombes £802.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 2002 Chateau Lascombes £780.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 2001 Chateau Lascombes £885.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 2000 Chateau Lascombes £1,050.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 1999 Chateau Lascombes £640.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 1998 Chateau Lascombes £573.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 1997 Chateau Lascombes £595.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 1996 Chateau Lascombes £800.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 1995 Chateau Lascombes £680.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 1990 Chateau Lascombes £799.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 1989 Chateau Lascombes £720.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 1986 Chateau Lascombes £1,188.00 12x75cl
Lascombes 1982 Chateau Lascombes £1,068.00 12x75cl

Highest rated vintages for Chateau Lascombes

96

The wine hits all cylinders in 2010. The average alcohol for the bottled wine is 14%. It has a gorgeously sweet nose of creme de cassis, spring flowers, subtle barbecue smoke and charcoal followed by full body, beautiful intensity, great purity, stature and length. The influence of any oak is minimal, despite the fact that 90% new French oak was used. Needless to say, this is an example of modern-styled winemaking at it's finest, and arguments that such wines will not age well, do not represent their terroir , and are soul-less, are totally groundless. Give it 5 or so years of cellaring and drink it over the following 25-30 years. This is one of the great Margaux wines of the vintage.Probably the greatest Lascombes made to date, the 2010 is a blend of 55% Merlot, 45% Cabernet Sauvignon and the rest Petit Verdot. The production from this huge estate totals nearly 400,000 bottles.

Robert Parker Jr
Wine Advocate #205
95

A gorgeous example of Lascombes, the 2005, a blend of 52% Cabernet Sauvignon, 45% Merlot, and the rest Petit Verdot, continues the remarkable turn-around in quality that began five years ago. A stunningly opulent wine with a dense purple color, the 2005 possesses a beautiful perfume of spring flowers, blueberries, blackberries, creosote, and graphite, full body, silky but noticeable tannins, a layered mouthfeel, and a stunning, 45+-second finish. This is a brilliant, modern-styled Margaux that should age for 30-35 years.

Robert Parker Jr
Wine Advocate #176
94

The 2009, which is inky blue/purple to the rim, is a final blend of 48% Cabernet Sauvignon, 48% Merlot and 4% Petit Verdot at 14% natural alcohol. The wine has a beautiful blueberry-scented nose with hints of acacia flowers, licorice, graphite and some subtle charcoal and background oak. Clearly a modern style of Margaux, it is pure, seamless, full-bodied and opulent, and the high glycerin and silky texture of 2009 are brilliantly displayed in this wine. Drink it over the next 15+ years, although it is certainly capable of lasting well past two decades. One of the more difficult estates to manage in southern Margaux is the 300 acres of Lascombes, subdivided into at least 40 to 50 separate plots, making harvest decisions, ripening, and related issues a strategic nightmare. Nevertheless, they seem to have hit pay dirt frequently over the last decade plus.

Robert Parker Jr
Wine Advocate #199
93

Another incredibly successful sleeper of the vintage, the 2008 Lascombes confirms just how many top 2008s were produced. A dark plum/ruby/purple-tinged color is followed by a sexy, up-front perfume of forest floor, damp earth, blue and red fruits and a touch of spicy oak. Lush with low acidity and sweet tannin, it appears to be a bigger version of the stunning 2008 Malescot St.-Exupery. Drink it over the next 15 or more years – it is well-worth buying by the case.

Robert Parker Jr
Wine Advocate #194
93

Another brilliant effort from this estate, the 2004 Lascombes (a blend of 50% Merlot, 45% Cabernet Sauvignon, and 5% Petit Verdot) exhibits a deep blue/purple hue along with a sweet perfume of blueberries, black raspberries, cherries, incense, smoke, and spring flowers. While opulent, underneath the full-bodied richness of fruit and depth is a structured wine. As it sits in the glass, an espresso roast character (no doubt from new oak) also emerges. Enjoy this pure, structured, fleshy beauty between 2010-2025.

Robert Parker Jr
Wine Advocate #171
93

A candidate for one of the top wines of the vintage, Lascombes has turned in a brilliant effort with a deep ruby/purple color as well as gorgeous aromas of plums, cassis, black cherries, and flowers. It boasts a terrific texture, medium to full body, an expansive, multi-layered mid-palate and a tremendously pure finish revealing nicely integrated wood, acidity, alcohol, and tannin. This is a beauty of precision and power. Anticipated maturity: 2007-2020.

Robert Parker Jr
Wine Advocate #158
93

This large, fragmented estate must be a logistical nightmare for winemakers, but the 2011, a blend of 55% Merlot, 40% Cabernet Sauvignon and 5% Petit Verdot, exhibits a beautifully scented nose of spring flowers, black raspberries, black currants, graphite and forest floor. Medium to full-bodied and rich with supple tannins, this terrific example of Lascombes continues their qualitative revolution that began over 15 years ago. One of the stars of the vintage, this beauty can be consumed over the next 20-25 years.

Robert Parker Jr
Wine Advocate #212 Apr 2014
92

In less than five years this property has emerged as one of the appellation’s up and coming stars thanks to the infusion of money from the American conglomerate, Colony Capital, as well as the braintrust that now oversees the winemaking, Yves Vatelot (of Reignac fame) and the internationally renowned oenologist, Michel Rolland. The dark plum/ruby-hued, open-knit 2003 offers a big, sweet nose of barbecue smoke, plum liqueur, creme de cassis, flowers, new saddle leather, and damp earth. Loads of black fruits, a full-bodied palate impression, low acidity, and a savory, expansive mouthfeel suggest it can be drunk in 2-3 years, or cellared for 15+.

Robert Parker Jr
Wine Advocate #164
92

The 2000 was the finest Lascombes produced in over three decades, and the 2001 continues the great success this estate is enjoying under the guidance of Yves Vatelot (of Chateau Reignac) and Dr. Alain Raynaud (Chateau Quinault l'Enclos). A blend of 55% Merlot, 40% Cabernet Sauvignon, and 5% Petit Verdot, it spent 18 months in cask (4 on its lees), and was bottled unfiltered. A dense ruby/purple color is accompanied by ripe aromas of spring flowers, blueberries, blackberries, and cassis. Medium-bodied, stylish, and elegant, with sweet tannin, impressive concentration, tremendous persistence as well as flavor intensity, and a 40+ second finish, this noble claret should be at its finest between 2005-2016.

Robert Parker Jr
Wine Advocate #153
(90-92)

An outstanding wine in this vintage, the full-bodied 2012 Lascombes reveals more power, concentration and texture than many of its peers. Its dense blue/purple color is followed by notes of acacia flowers, blueberries, black raspberries, black currants, vanillin and toast. Medium to full-bodied with excellent texture (for a 2012), as well as good follow through and length, this soft, plush, outstanding Margaux should drink well for 12-15 years.

Robert Parker Jr
Wine Advocate #206