Morey-Saint-Denis Wine Region Summary

Travelling south along the D 974 from Gevrey-Chambertin is the village of Morey-St-Denis and home to five grand Cru climats as well as 20 premier cru. Whilst the total production of wine is overwhelmingly red wine (96%) they do produce a little Chardonnay. Appellation rules dictate that the base yield is 40 hectoliter per hectare for the red and 45 for the white with a minimum of 10.5% alcohol for a village wine rising to 11% for premier & Grand Cru. The AOC is one of the smallest in the Cote de Nuits with only 94 hectares dedicated to wine production.

Whilst flying under the radar Morey-Saint-Dennis produces four highly reputable grand cru climats and another, Bonnes Mares which is shared with Chambolle-Musigny, though the majority of this is in Chambolle. Interesting; two of the Grand Crus; Clos de Tart & Clos des Lambrays are Monopoles; in that they are both controlled by a single Domaine. An archetypal Morey wine would be in between the firm and bold style of a Gevrey-Chambertin but with a little more elegance and perfume that you may expect of a Chambolle-Musigny.

All of the Grand Crus can command a lofty price; though more so the Clos de la Roche and Clos St Denis.  There are many influential Domaines, with significant holdings; including Domaines Ponsot, Dujac & Arnoux Lachaux producing world class wines, with the likes of Coquard Loison Fleurot snapping at their heels. In 2005 Domane Ponsot’s Clos de la Roche was famously rewarded with 99 Points from leading Burgundy critic, Allen Meadows; one of only a handful of “99 Point” scores he had ever assigned. This wine currently trades at £10,000 per 12 bottles.